Oh, okay. We are live on the social media consultants Facebook group and also simultaneously on Instagram. Nice. Looks like with, or good joke has joined. Amen. To see you. Alrighty. Cause some coffee. I’m here for about 20 minutes, 25 minutes. And um, maybe talking about the importance of mentors and mentorship and, uh, I’m gonna take you on a journey through one of my, uh, stories that’s happened in life and hopefully that you can, um, in the hope that you can draw some parallels with your life about it. Mmm. So cool. Um, so the importance of mentorship and mentoring, you know, it’s like, it’s one of those things which a lot of people talk about. Um, Vandy around has been important, but not an awful lot of people do. It actually is one of the things that I’ve discovered, um, which is kind of strange. Um, but I think that’s a lot of time.

(02:11):
That’s because they’ve never been in a situation to grab it with both hands and, um, realize quite how empowering it can be. Um, to have somebody, um, believe in you. Somebody’s got your back. Um, uh, so that’s what I want to talk about today. Um, and you know, like when, when there is somebody that believes in you, who you consider to be of, um, of great value in life, you respect them, you, you, um, you’re really blown away by what they do, how they do it. And you also can kind of imagine yourself that you would like to be in that situation too. Um, it’s actually, uh, an a fantastic thing. It’s really a super thing to be holed actually, uh, because you sort of future vision where you’d like to be, um, you know, and that comes from, from Falcon where you want to be in life really.

(03:14):
So I want to talk about when I was a lot younger and um, so the story goes but high also service, uh, in [inaudible], wherever that is on Instagram. Hi. Um, so the life story I want to talk about is, um, I’m going to go back a long way here and um, and, and talk about when I became a teacher, uh, initially, uh, Danny, hi there. Uh, so, so going back a long time now, I’m now 50, uh, but I want to go back to my twenties. Um, so back in the nineties, I had, um, I’d come out of the military. I’ve been in the military for a few years and, uh, and despite the training, which is great, I was learning how to, what I learned how to serve as helicopters, all things. Uh, so I was, had an electronics background. Um, ah, but I found I was never really that suited to the military.

(04:12):
I was far too creative. I had far too many ideas of my own, far too entrepreneurial, looking back on it. So I didn’t last a great deal of time, but when I came out with that, I was, uh, I was working in bands. And, um, by the way, if you can see this just drop a like or a wave or something, it really helps to know if anyone’s there. So I can just say hello to you guys. Um, so yeah, I, I came out of this, this out of the military and I was kicking around in bands and I was doing some work in some studios, helping to fix studios, lifting the lids off, mixing desks and figuring out what was wrong and looking at wiring looms and all the plumbing and stuff, electrical, plumbing. Um, and I was in this band with, uh, with a music, a music teacher, and he was, uh, what I would say a prolific musician.

(05:03):
Um, I was merely like 24, 23, 24. Uh, and I was in a, I suppose a dark place. I was in a kind of a dark place actually at the time, you know, because it was like, what am I going to do in my life? I’m in my early twenties. Um, I’d just come out of the career limit of the military cause that wasn’t suited to me. And I think the, you know, like what am I going to do? Um, and I know I wanted to do something related to music at the time anyway, but I wasn’t really doing an awful lot. I was doing a bit of guitar teaching, a little bit there, a little bit of studio servicing, but I got into this band, which was a working band. And um, and this guy was much older than me. He was a good 20 years older than me.

(05:43):
He, uh, and he’d recently quit a guy by the name of Bob actually, and he’d recently quit teaching to concentrate full time on his band. Uh, and I was in the bandwidth and I was, um, I was okay playing guitar, but I was, you know, it wasn’t amazing, but I was not a good idea and I could read a little bit of music. And this guy was a prolific reader and he was in a working band now and a working band. It’s sort of band whereby you get given the sheet of music on the way to the gig, you know, like we were in the, in the van on the way to a gig and you’d say, Hey Chris, we’re going to play this. And I’d be like, Oh my God, how can I do this? He’s like daunting task, like, um, incredibly daunting, uh, to learn and sort of almost sight read this stuff.

(06:29):
Um, but anyway, I did that for a good six to seven, eight months. We were working all over the country in this berm and he was about to start teaching again, have having had is a year out at a local college. And, uh, he said, Chris, I’m going to start up some sound engineering courses and I’d like you to come and teach women teach, you know, like, and uh, like, sorry, did I hear you right? You want me to come and be a teacher at the local college? I how young in my twenties, like 23, 24. I said, no, forget about you. Like I’ve never done that. And I had to do it. I would just, I was full of like, why would you even ask me? Um, and I think at the time looking back, he, he, you know, I used to talk about things in the studio with him about like how an effect pedal works for a guitar or how the mixing desks work.

(07:20):
And I think he understood quite early on that I had higher lacquer and Macquarie is it? Uh, Lachlan aren’t Larry. Uh, and I think you understood quite early on that I had a knack for what I would call synthesizing, um, quite complex subjects into layman’s terms and explaining them to people, which is obviously a good trait of teachers. Um, and also I could find it quite motivating, you know, so, um, anyway, he persisted and persisted and persisted forever. And, uh, I don’t know how many times he came to see me. And, um, I eventually caved in. I said, okay, I’ll give it a go. And he actually, and I looking back on it, he, he saw something in me, which, uh, which I didn’t, I just didn’t know at the time that I had in me, you know. Um, but I had nothing else to do, so I thought I’d give it a go.

(08:15):
So I went along to the first day of college and I can remember, I remember walking in the first day of college, never had teaching qualifications or an experience to this, to, uh, to room full of students who were there for, they’re there, they’re there, they’re sitting gills, they’re state verify qualification, um, on the, the front to, to, to introduce them. Like, guys, I’m your teacher. And, uh, and I was just like crapping myself, you know, like unbelievable fear. Um, anyway, after the first hour and a half, I started to really get into it and unliked it. And I sensed that there was a good vibe in the, um, in the classroom. And, and I, and I think being a musician as well, you get too used to being in front of people. Um, and you can kind of get to read an audience. Uh, and I could read, um, I could read their vibe, you know, and their emotions and like, it was a great feeling.

(09:16):
And actually after that day of teaching, I was actually wiped out, but I really enjoyed it. It was like incredibly rewarding. Uh, anyway, to cut a very long story short, I stuck with it. Um, and I’m glad I did because to blow my own trumpet, I actually, um, was really good at teaching and I took to it like a, like a duck takes to water and it, and it really suited me. Uh, and um, so the first year we started off with like I think 20 part time students. Anyway, by after two or three, four years, we were up to like 150 students full time, three or four different qualifications. And what I discovered was that I was a, an entrepreneurial academic entrepreneurial trainer, teacher. Um, and I was writing courses. I started offering courses. Um, and the, the point is that, um, he was a mentor to me, you know, and, and I didn’t realize it at the time.

(10:16):
I just didn’t understand that he could see something in me, which I obviously couldn’t. Um, and I, and I think that’s what makes a good mentor and I think it works for us when we’re able to embrace that and embrace our fears. And that’s what I’ve done ever since then. And actual fact that was a monumental, uh, milestone in my career because after that, I, uh, I ended up teaching in, in universities. It became a university lecture and I offered degrees, uh, up to undergraduate level and also master’s level. Uh, and I along the way, I thought I better take this a bit seriously. Um, so I, after a few years I enrolled straight into a master’s course myself, which was in online education. Uh, and I studied that part time for three years. And at the end of that, um, three years studying process of being a student online.

(11:10):
And now this is like back in, um, they’re like 99, 2000, you know, um, for my thesis I developed an online school, so you can imagine, you can imagine right now, and this was an online school for teaching people how to make records. Cause I’d had, you know, good six years by then in the industry of teaching and qualifications and stuff. And also practicing being a musician and a studio guy. And I launched my online school. And, um, and you can imagine back in the year 2000, 2001 if you talk, someone says, what do you do? Or you say, well, I do some teaching, but I’ve also for my thesis, which I ran for the first year, um, I, I did this almost school and then after the thesis I kept it running and started charging people money to take the courses. And like back in 2000 2001, if you mentioned the idea that it’s an online school, people are like, what?

(12:01):
You know, I mean this was like back in the days of modems when you connect up through a phone with a little node and making squeaky noises. It was like, what are you talking about? And online school, it was rocket science, right? So it was like an early adopter of, of creating online courses and online community. Uh, and that’s what my masters was all about. Uh, anyway, I, so I ran that. Um, I ran that school for um, eight years. Uh, I moved different parts of the world. I ended up living in Italy for a number of years playing rugby for Milan in Italy. You had amazing time cause I was working from anywhere. I was geographically independent, a nomad almost. It doesn’t, it didn’t matter where I was. I chose Italy cause I liked it. Um, and then to cut another long story short, after running it for eight years, somebody came along and wanted to buy it.

(12:50):
Uh, so I sold the school. I mean at first when someone came along and said, we want to buy your scores. And I, she was disbelief. I just couldn’t believe somebody was like wanting to buy it. And um, and uh, anyway, come along at the right times. I start having children with my wife and we needed it. We needed a house. So I sewed it. And, um, and since then I’ve been being consulting, uh, because after having run an online business for eight years, you really get an idea of how to, how to market and how to work online and be a consultant rather people. So I started doing my, I did for my school. Uh, all those skills that I’d learned, I started doing that for other businesses. And that’s when I really started earning, um, serious amounts of money. Um, you know, five figures a month, quickly, easily, you know, six figures a year.

(13:38):
I mean, it was, you know, it was, it was a lot of money. Um, anyway, so the point I’m telling you this is, um, I, somebody saw something in me, um, all the way back in my early twenties. I had no idea was there. Uh, so I’m incredibly thankful for that guy, Bob, you know, uh, rest his rest, his soul and he, he passed away a number of years ago. But I, it’s, it’s fundamentally important to realize when those milestones are staring you in the face, you know, and um, I and I took a lot of persuasion to be, to be mentored and, and it wasn’t officially called mentorship. He, he was just there. And like anytime I needed something or couldn’t understand something, I’d go to him asking the question. Looking back, it was just mentorship. He was just, he was just helping me through life. And as that’s the amazing sign of a teacher, you know, if you can find people like that in life who are willing to spend time with you and uh, and mentor you through skills, mentor you through a new career and help you, they really are to be embraced.

(14:47):
Um, you know, fully, you know, um, because they don’t come along very often. Actually these [inaudible] that’s what I’ve learned as well. These opportunities where someone’s willing to say, look, I will help you because I can see something in you. I will invest my time. Um, and perhaps you’ll pay me for that. Um, and I will, I will take you through a mentor, you and, uh, so that’s what I do. Now. I spend a lot of time with people that I think I can help. Um, and actually helping people first met primarily making your number one goal to assist people and help people is, is incredibly rewarding. It’s more than anything else because I think if you do that, and that’s what I’ve always done since that first mentorship on official mentorship. But that guy that was, um, hi there, Manny. Uh, Karen’s joy. Hi guys.

(15:38):
Um, I’ve always learned from that I’ve learned that if I, I learned from him, he gave, gave, gave, gave, told me every taught me everything. And I learned from him that that’s the way that you create value in life. And if you do that, if you give you constantly give to people, you help other people, business takes care of itself, business will come to you, finance will come to you because you adopt a, an abundance mindset of giving to people because, and it’s all about giving back. And it’d be, and that’s where you’ll be successful. You don’t have to become a cheesy salesperson anymore because if you’re constantly giving and educating people, business will come to you. You attract people, you become magnetic. Um, and that’s what I’ve learned over the years of the importance of that mentorship, that unofficial mentorship that I have from that guy, Bob.

(16:27):
Um, because quite frankly, all of the success that I’ve had in business since then has been the result of that mindset. It’s, it’s knowing that someone’s there for me. Um, you know, and he would say things sometimes to me, the like I was thinking like, why would I want to do that? That’s like not great idea. That’s, but I would try anyway. And sure enough, you know, he was older, he was wiser. Uh, he’d done it. He’d been through it already and the, he knew the pathway which w that I should have taken. Uh, so I did. And, um, so that’s what I’ve done. And even, you know, after that, when I was running my honors school and then also with consultancy, I seek out other people continuously who I think, um, will benefit me some way in life. Um, and that’s never related to finance.

(17:22):
I’m not hunting around for people that are loaded with money. I’m hunting around for people that were very, very positive mindset. People that like to achieve things. People that don’t waste time, uh, people that are productive, efficient, uh, reasoned, um, reflect. Um, but a very, very highly focused. So I’m always craving people like that and my life because I know it works and I know that people like that are valuable. They’re valued valuable to me because it helps me to continue growing. I mean, like I’m 50, I was 50 this year, right? But, and I had this epiphany that she need, like I’ve had, uh, two businesses. I’ve grown in soul and I’ve got another successful business up and running. And I’ve also got the social media, math, social media, mathew.com Academy, uh, which is new. Um, but it’s great. You’ve got a lovely community building and you guys are watching this and I’m so thankful for that.

(18:18):
Um, but the point is, um, I’m 50 now, but I feel like I’m only just beginning. You know what I mean? It’s like, it’s like you’re never too old. You’re never too young. It’s just wherever you are in your mindset right now, is it, that’s where it’s going to work. If you embrace opportunity, if you grab it by the, with both hands, it’s yours. You know? And I’m mostly, what I find is it’s not all about this stuff is not about tactical stuff. It’s not about technique necessarily. Um, it’s, it’s 80%, if not 90% in the mind, in the head. It’s just mindset. It’s looking at your fears and dealing with your fears. It’s looking at negativity that might be in your life and actually putting into a box and thinking that’s a negative there. So I can do something with that. It’s, it’s not going to affect me.

(19:14):
I can process that. And just looking at the areas of your mind whereby you control your mind to be who you are. I’ll tell you a great book that goes into a lot of stuff about this is by a guy called, um, I mean I read a lot of self development books and I’ve done that for a number of years now and I find it incredibly useful. Um, one of them is by a guy called professor Steve Peters. Um, uh, it’s called the Chimp paradox. Uh, and he splits the mind up into three things mainly, which is simplified, but there’s three main aspects. One is the human and the human is, is, is what I like to think. I’m kind of like being a human. Now I’m explaining me what my values are. I’ve been honest, I’ve been transparent. I, it’s what I want to achieve in life is where I want to go in life.

(20:00):
The other aspect is sort. So the humans really related to your values, deep values, your core values, what you believe in, what you believe to be right and how you see the world. The other one is the computer, which is like the program which fires all those responses out based on your human instinct and what you feel. And the other side is the Chimp, which is the massive emotional mind. The reactive one. Okay. Just it gets scared because it was in front of a person never seen before. It’s like, who is that person? You get them to Chimp mode, uh, you know, like, and that Chimp needs managing all right. And like, and mostly it’s the Chimp in our lives, which prevents us from progressing and achieving things because the Chimp is like someone on your shoulder say, no, you want to do that? No, that’s not going to work.

(20:49):
And it’s constantly there. So this book is all about developing strategies to manage it. You can’t suppress the Chimp. It’s powerful and it’s useful. You just need to manage it and our strategies to manage that Chimp so that you can use it to the best of your advantage to achieve, achieve what you want as a human. Um, I’m not going to go into any further detail than that, but just to say the mindset is fundamentally important. And I, and I, and, and I can’t stress how important it is with men deciding if you want to go on board with a mentor, um, or not. Uh, and, and it’s, and it’s about embracing [inaudible], embracing the opportunities in front of you and getting over the fear. And it’s not even getting over. It’s just managing it and using it productively. Um, so that, that’s the story of Bob, uh, who was an unofficial mentor.

(21:42):
He never ever said to me, Chris, I’m your mentor. It was, it was, dude, I really liked your guitar playing the button. That’s all cool, but do you want to come and teach? And I was like, Whoa. So you’re talking about, and the Chimp was like saying, no, no, I can’t teach. That’s not going to work. Like, and the Chimp was saying, no, no, no. And eventually after period time, like I said, he, he persisted and I said, okay, I’ll give it a go. And the rest is history. So it was about embracing those fears. I’ve often found that in life that um, fear is the, we all get scared of stuff. Right? But actually the other side of fear, once the event has happened, let’s say it’s lose your job, you’re like, you know, like the other side of it, it’s actually not as bad as we think it is.

(22:27):
The outcome is not that bad. Um, it’s the same with business opportunities. I had a conversation with someone yesterday, a close friend, and they were like, Oh, I’m not going to make this contract. You know, I said, well, fine, if you don’t make the contract, business opportunities are like buses. And she said, what do you mean? Like I said, well, there’s always another one coming around the corner. You know, like this, there’s always another business opportunity around the corner that you can, that will probably be more aligned to you. Um, so I think it’s fundamentally important that you, that you approach life, uh, with that kind of mindset that you in actual fact, you know, I talk about working on the business, um, and building it with techniques and stuff, but fundamentally it’s more about working on, on us as a you, it’s about, uh, improving us as a human, improving us.

(23:24):
Uh, you know, our outlook, our vision, our values, and stripping away the things that are not important to us, to where we want to go to. Those are the fundamental things I think, which, which age you to get where you want to get in life. Um, and as I said, if you have that mentality of wanting to improve yourself to be the best you actually be, um, I mean another great, another great quote. Um, and, and actually we’ve got this quote was one of our 24 25 code of conduct, uh, statements in the social media. maffia.com Academy is, uh, always whenever you are, whatever you’re doing, always be the best vision, the best version, uh, of you. So always imagine whatever you’re doing, that somebody’s there watching you, someone’s, they’re looking at you and never do anything that you wouldn’t do if someone was there watching you.

(24:20):
You know, you always trying to maximize yourself. You’re always trying to be the best you can absolutely be. And as I said, I think fundamentally the whole becoming aS so, you know, being a social media consultant, which is what this group’s about and just what social media, Matthew dotcoms about becoming a social media consultant is not anything to do with hashtags on Instagram. Instagram is not how often you post on Pinterest or what you do on tick tock. It’s not the strategies. It’s, it’s been a good you, the best you and improved you week after week. It’s all about mindset. I’m sure we’ve got structures in place to tell you what you need to do and templates and scripts in order to make sales. Um, but those things are only gonna work if it feels comfortable and if they’re aligned with where you want to be as a person.

(25:13):
I, you know, like, and I cannot emphasize how important that is. Um, because you’ve got to get out of bed every day and really relish what you want to do. You gotta be loving it. It’s gotta be like the best thing ever. You know, like, I mean, sure, it can be like that every day, but you really got to be wanting, right? What can I do today that’s gonna make me a better person? How can I achieve it? The Italians. All right, have a great phrase. I learned this when I lived in Italy. Um, and it’s a beautiful phrase. They have a phrase called Labella Figura now literally translated. It means a beautiful figure. Like you would say, Oh, that bell, if you go to, she cuts a beautiful figure or he cuts a beautiful, uh, he cuts a beautiful figure or he walks nicely, or you dance as well.

(25:56):
There’s a nice car, you know, like, but, but fundamentally they, they’ve, they use it in a wider context to mean if you’re in any situation, um, so you’re eating at the table, knife and forks and stuff. You always try to aim in life to leave the situation in a more beautiful way than that than when you found it. Not like, I mean, I find that a beautiful thing, right? You like, it’s, that’s spreading magic everywhere you go. Like, if you can add some magic, you can add more beautifulness in every area of your life, every day. Whatever you do, that’s an amazing thing to live by. You know, it’s like, because good things happen. Like, you know, you become a very likable person. People like that. You know, I’m, the opposite of that is just leaving the dinner plates there and the knife and fork.

(26:49):
I can’t be bothered walking or you know, no one likes that, you know, like, so it’s, it’s all about that. Bella, LA, LA, LA Bella Figura, you know, and that’s what I tried to do in life, as I said before, try to approach that mindset and always improve in some way and add something which is missing. Um, lots of people join here on out scream. Hi guys. Nice to see you. And I think it’s more in, uh, Facebook, Tabby and I see you here. Um, so look, I hope you’ve enjoyed it. I’m not gonna talk forever here, but, um, cause it’s getting late in the UK, but both go back and watch this because it’s, there’s a lot of things in here which I’ve touched on which, which are fundamental to becoming a social media consultant. And quite honestly, as I’ve said so many times before, to get up to five figures a month as a social media consultant is way, way simpler and easier than a lot of people think.

(27:47):
I mean, it’s 80% mindset. It’s 20%, uh, process. Uh, you need good processes behind it, which is why we have templates and scripts in the Academy. It tells you what to say, how to say it. But it’s really about retraining your brain and your outlook and your delivery and your persona and your mindset to put yourself in that situation of being a confident consultant and have a conversation with another human being that’s got a problem that needs fixing. And if you do your, your, your target market correctly in your research, correct, you will find people that will pay you two grand a month to do their, uh, their social media, their marketing, the digital stuff. Will you, there’s businesses everywhere they’ll pay that cause it’s far cheaper than employing somebody and they’re getting much more expertise cause you’re working at the front line on it.

(28:40):
So it’s quite simple to get to 10 K easily. It’s not as difficult as people think. And so many people get wrapped up in the, in the technicals, in the hash, the hashtags on Instagram, you know, like how often should I post this and the other, like it’s all about getting business. It’s all about getting clients that you want to work with that like you, you have a good relationship. It’s a, it’s, it’s a two way thing. You improving as a person. You’re giving, they’re gaining, you know, the, the work side of it. A lot of it you can outsource, as I said in last week’s show. So look guys, if you get the opportunity to be mentored and someone comes along like this, um, and you know, it, here’s a pitch. Perhaps I hadn’t really thought about this until now, but I think I will be offering some mentorship, um, to get people to 10 K a month.

(29:38):
Um, and I will charge for that because I’m going to have to invest time, um, to get people there. Uh, but I’ll, but keep, keep an eye out in the group for those notifications because I really want to start giving back in, in a much more meaningful way. It, you know, I think the Academy is great and we’re refining it and there’s so much value in there. And I hope some of you are finding, finding that too. But fundamentally, um, some people really do need to be handheld and, and guided. And I totally get that cause that’s how I’ve, uh, how my career, you know, sort of kicked off, uh, with my first mentor in my early twenties, and, and it was, you know, it’s been life changing actually. Uh, anyway, so guys, thank you so much for joining me. Um, I’ve been on a half an hour. It’s enough.

(30:26):
It’s 10 30 and UK. So, uh, by all means, please just drop hashtags a replay if you’re watching this on the replay. Um, um, I really do appreciate you participating in these. It’s, it’s wonderful. Um, and uh, and I really do enjoy it. I love giving back to you guys and, um, helping out where I can. So, um, cool. I’ll, I’ll leave it at that for now. Um, if you’ve got any questions, please post them in the comments. Um, that might be just a good idea just before I sign off. Um, or again, if you’re on the replay, just pop some questions in as well because I will get to them and answer them. And that interaction is also really good for the both of us higher. There’s more people on Instagram here. Sanya dental. Uh, bruh. I dunno. Wow. It’s amazing names. A tablet is a Manny most to see your guys.

(31:21):
Um, cool.

(31:26):
Okay. So, um, thanks ever so much guys. I really appreciate it. Love your attention. Um, if you’ve got any ideas for further subjects, please let me know, uh, more than happy to cover them. And, uh, I look forward to seeing you on the next one. Watch out for the notifications about mentorship, if that’s something that interests you. Um, because, uh, like I said, getting to 10 K a month, it’s not as difficult as you think. If you follow the process and you’re willing to be, um, you’re willing to have your mind open to different ways of doing things because the, the, the, the ways that work for a lot of people now, probably if you’re not earning 10K already, they’re probably never going to work, are they? So they probably need to be changed, uh, with different mindset. All right guys, thanks ever so much. And uh, I’ll see you on the next one. Uh, do Josh with comments? I really appreciate it. Thanks. Bye.